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John Wayne – Rio Lobo (1970)

John Wayne – Rio Lobo (1970)

From Wikipedia: Rio Lobo is a 1970 American Western film starring John Wayne. The film was the last film directed by Howard Hawks, from a script by Leigh Brackett. The film was shot in Technicolor with a running time of 114 minutes. The musical score was composed by Jerry Goldsmith and the movie was filmed at Cuernavaca in the Mexican state of Morelos and at Tucson, Arizona.

It was the third Howard Hawks film varying the idea of a sheriff defending his office against belligerent outlaw elements in the town, after Rio Bravo (1959) and El Dorado (1966), both also starring John Wayne.

Director: Howard Hawks
Writers: Burton Wohl (screenplay), Leigh Brackett
Stars: John Wayne, Jorge Rivero, Jennifer O’Neill

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The New Adventures of Sherlock Holmes

The New Adventures of Sherlock Holmes

The New Adventures of Sherlock Holmes was an old-time radio show which aired in the USA from October 2, 1939 to July 7, 1947. The show first aired on the Blue Network but later moved to the Mutual Broadcasting System. The radio stories were action packed, filled with atmosphere, and featured great music by Lou Kosloff, as well as excellent sound effects.

Originally, the show starred Basil Rathbone as Sherlock Holmes and Nigel Bruce as Dr. Watson. Together, they starred in 220 episodes which aired weekly on Mondays from 8:30 to 9:00pm. Commercialism seeped into the radio show from the start, as Watson himself, played by various actors, took on the co-host role with a spokesman for G. Washington Tea as a visitor ready to hear a Holmes story. Before a blazing fire with tea always at the brew, Watson reminiscences the great tales between comments on how good the tea is! Bromo Quinine sponsored some of the earlier programs on the NBC Blue Network and for a period Parker Pen was the sponsor.

Jurlique US Basil Rathbone’s last episode as the famous detective was “The Singular Affair of the Baconian Cipher.” He was eager to separate himself from the cast type of Holmes, and even though the show’s sponsor Petri Wine offered him generous pay to continue, he decided to move on. Once he did, the sponsor did as well, and Tom Conway took the starring role, though Nigel Bruce got top billing and was always announced first. The new sponsor was Kreml Hair Tonic for Men, and the new series only lasted 39 episodes.

In 1955, NBC re-ran the transcribed BBC series of the original great Conan Doyle stories with the fine actors Sir John Gielgud as Holmes, and Sir Ralph Richardson as Watson, and in “The Final Problem,” Orson Welles as Moriarty.

For American radio, the heroine of Holmes on the radio was Edith Meiser, an actress who loved the stories and was convinced they would make great listening. She scripted several Conan Doyle stories and took them around. NBC liked them, but had no sponsor ready. Meiser Shopped for a sponsor for the show herself, and went back to the network triumphantly. Beginning in the early 1930’s, she single-handed wrote the show for over a dozen years, first working from the Conan Doyle canon, and then continuing to create stories in the spirit of the originals.

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Joel McCrea – Cattle Empire (1958)


Recently released from jail, ex-convict cowboy John Cord (Joel McCrea) is hired to drive a large herd of cattle to Fort Clemson. However, the man who hires him turns out to be the very same person that had Cord thrown in jail five years earlier for vandalizing his town in an alcohol-induced rampage. Though this town leader does not remember Cord, Cord remembers him all too well. He takes the job, knowing this could be the perfect opportunity to get back at the man who destroyed his life.

Initial release: April 28, 1958
Director: Charles Marquis Warren
Distributed by: 20th Century Fox
Cast: Joel McCrea, Gloria Talbott
Music composed by: Paul Sawtell, Bert Shefter
Written by: Daniel B. Ullman, Endre Bohem, Charles Marquis Warren

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Johnny Cash – Were You There (when They Crucified My Lord)

Johnny Cash – Were You There (when They Crucified My Lord)

John R. “Johnny” Cash (February 26, 1932 – September 12, 2003) was a singer-songwriter, actor, and author, widely considered one of the most influential American musicians of the 20th century. Although primarily remembered as a country icon, his genre-spanning songs and sound embraced rock and roll, rockabilly, blues, folk, and gospel. This crossover appeal won Cash the rare honor of multiple induction in the Country Music, Rock and Roll, and Gospel Music Halls of Fame.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Were You There (When They Crucified My Lord) is an American spiritual that was first printed in 1899.

There are some of the more recent plantation hymns which have added an element of culture without diminishing religious fervor. One of the best of these is “Were You There When They Crucified My Lord?” It dwells on the details of the crucifixion, and the separate stanzas add only a single line each to the song. It is a tender and beautiful hymn, the climax of its effect depending largely on the hold and slur on the exclamation “Oh!” with which the third line begins, and the repetition and expression of the word “tremble! tremble! tremble!”

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Boston Blackie Radio Show

Boston Blackie is a fictional character who has been on both sides of the law. As originally created by author Jack Boyle, he was a safecracker — a hardened criminal who had served time in a California prison. Prowling the underworld as a detective in adaptations for films, radio, and television, the detective Boston Blackie was “an enemy to those who make him an enemy, friend to those who have no friend”.

The Boston Blackie radio series, starring Chester Morris, began June 23, 1944, on NBC as a summer replacement for The Amos ‘n’ Andy Show. Sponsored by Rinso, the series continued until September 15 of that year. Unlike the concurrent films, Blackie had a steady romantic interest in the radio show — Lesley Woods appeared as Blackie’s girlfriend Mary Wesley. Harlow Wilcox was the show’s announcer.

On April 11, 1945, Richard Kollmar took over the title role in a radio series syndicated by Frederic W. Ziv to Mutual and other network outlets. Over 200 episodes of this series were produced between 1944 and October 25, 1950. Other sponsors included Lifebuoy Soap, Champagne Velvet beer, and R&H beer. While investigating mysteries, Blackie invaribly encountered harebrained Police Inspector Farraday (Maurice Tarplin) and always solved the mystery to Farraday’s amazement.

Initially, friction surfaced in the relationship between Blackie and Farraday, but as the series continued, Farraday recognized Blackie’s talents and requested assistance. Blackie dated Mary Wesley (Jan Miner), and for the first half of the series, his best pal Shorty was always on hand. The humorless Farraday was on the receiving end of Blackie’s bad puns and word play.

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Bill Monroe – Body And Soul

Bill Monroe – Body And Soul

William Smith Monroe (Bill Monroe) – September 13, 1911 – September 9, 1996) was an mandolinist who helped create the style of music known as bluegrass. The genre takes its name from his band, the “Blue Grass Boys”, named for Monroe’s home state of Kentucky. Monroe’s performing career spanned 60 years as a singer, instrumentalist, composer and bandleader. He is often referred to as The Father of Bluegrass.

The picture is that of Bill Monroe taken backstage of the Grand Ole Opry in 1993 with Sharon White (wife of Ricky Staggs) and Rocky Thomas (host of CCMR TV Country).

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Big Jon And Sparky

Although Jon Arthur created and produced Big Jon and Sparkie for kids, it is a wonderfully inventive and gently humorous show that many adults will find utterly charming. It may be for its opening theme, The Teddy Bear’s Picnic. Big Jon is the regular mild-mannered father figure that loves and cares for Sparkie. “Ukie” is the pretty goofy but adventurous cabbie who is their friend.

But the show really revolves around Sparkie who sounds like a little “elf from the land of make-believe” but acts and thinks just like a real boy. In that earlier time, a “live” voice like a cartoon that was a part of a “real” show was something special for kids. It’s still special to listen to today, as Jon Arthur’s gentle and witty writing about a small town’s characters (although it’s Cincinnati!) makes this show great fun. For the record, Jon Arthur did nearly all of the voices and oversaw the show’s production single-handedly.

His use of sound effects and interlude music is exemplary. He was quoted as saying that all the ideas on the show were from real life, or were sent in by the show’s thousands of young fans. They even had a “What Does Sparkie Really Look Like Contest”, and the accompanying photo is Jon